Gender Queer

By the inimitable Ali Buttkicker Bee!

Listen Here

image

Well I can look like a man, behave just like a man
But claim I have no privilege, just because I can
So open up your space for us and don’t be making any fuss
Cos we all should be welcome here,
Can’t you see I’m gender queer?

CH. I’m gender queer dear, I’m gender queer
Though I’ve got a hard on You should have no fear
I’m gender queer dear, I’m gender queer
Look at me cry a little gender queer tear

I might wear a shirt and tie and have a neck beard and a penis
But I’m not a man you bigot, I have no feels of he-ness
Put your trust in gender, gender means no harm
So let us in, there is no spin
And remember to keep calm

CH. I’m gender queer dear, I’m gender queer
Though I’ve got a hard on You should have no fear
I’m gender queer dear, I’m gender queer
Look at me cry a little gender queer tear

All of us know we’re men dear, though some of us say we’re aren’t
We can be whatever we want now, don’t you say that we can’t
Some days I will be a lady, some days I will be a man
If I want I will be a unicorn
Just because I can

CH. I’m gender queer dear, I’m gender queer
Though I’ve got a hard on You should have no fear
I’m gender queer dear, I’m gender queer
Look at me cry a little gender queer tear

We’ll let a few women in and they can be genderqueer too
But not too many cos we want control, of the crazy genderqueer crew
But they’ll buy the madness we sell, and hook line and sinker they’ll fall
They’ll lap it all up like a cat with the cream
And come whenever we call

CH. I’m gender queer dear, I’m gender queer
Though I’ve got a hard on You should have no fear
I’m gender queer dear, I’m gender queer
Look at me cry a little gender queer tear

If this sounds like the same old story, It may be that that’s what it is
But we don’t much care what you think now and who this crap damages
As long as we get our fun dear and things carry on much the same
We keep our privilege, wouldn’t want to change that
So we’ll keep making the rules of the game

CH. I’m gender queer dear, I’m gender queer
Though I’ve got a hard on You should have no fear
I’m gender queer dear, I’m gender queer
Look at me cry a little gender queer tear

If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck
Don’t be surprised if it acts like a duck.

Love From the Land

From an earlier MichFest.

 

Melissa Ferrick, “I Don’t Want You To Change.”

 

Tweet this shit, or spin these yarns over a craft beer at your favorite sex-positive-poly-queer-trans-feminine bar and grille

Hypotaxis

(This is a collaboration with the amazingly clever Phonaesthetica.)

About a month ago, AfterEllen.com published a lengthy trans-apologist piece absolving men-who-feel-like-women of all culpability in the destruction of women-only and lesbian space. The article was the usual, run-of-the-mill, “Why all you dykes gotta be so uptight?” bullshit espoused by liberal feminists who are far more concerned with protecting the delicate male ego than supporting women, much less lesbians. Unsurprisingly, the article culminated with the author expressing hope that the word “lesbian” will be diluted to accommodate men and no longer denote “female homosexual.”

The article was the same old trite, man-centric, mental-Cheetos one might find on Everydaymisogyny.com or the TransAdvocate: Lesbians are mean because they don’t want dick. Radical feminists are mean because their politics center women.

Predictably, the author of the AfterEllen.com article cited “internet sensation” Cathy Brennan as being the meanest mean of ALL TIMES, fixating on her…

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Michfest – going home, leaving home

Listening to Lesbians

I close my eyes and I am back in the Michigan woods, lying in fern and leaf litter, listening to the woods and the voices of women. I open my eyes and the shadow of leaves and voices remain while the sounds of Australian birds and the smell of Australian plants intrude. They’re not ferns, but they’re what I have and they are glorious.

Banksia Not remotely fernlike…

This year, for my first and only time, I went to Michigan Womyn’s Music Festival, started by Lisa Vogel 40 years ago. I had gone with as few expectations as possible, helped by the flurry of activity in the weeks before I left and the daze I walked through the gate in.

The experience was a revelation, in expected and unexpected ways.

While listening to CC Carter sing about her hips, I realised with a rush that this is what representation might feel…

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Is there a ‘state of emergency’ around trans murders in the US?

Open Letter to MANA

Please email womancenteredmidwifery@gmail.com to sign-on to this open letter:

Open Letter to the Midwives Alliance of North America regarding the recent revisions to the organization’s standing Core Competencies Document:

August 20, 2015

Dear Midwives Alliance of North America Board of Directors and MANA Membership:

We are writing in response to your revisions of the MANA Core Competencies. MANA’s attempts at inclusivity are commendable in today’s complex world. We are concerned, however, by accelerating trends in our culture to deny material biological reality and further disconnect ourselves from nature, and the ways in which the revisions may support these trends. Midwives have long practiced the precautionary principle, counseling against the adoption of technologies and theories that have not been proven safe or beneficial to mothers and babies, and by extension, the entire human community. We respectfully ask the MANA board to reverse the 2014 revisions and consider the ways in which the attempted changes may have harmful implications for women.

Full letter at link here.

The “Equality Act” Hurts Women

stop trans chauvinism

from: https://actionnetwork.org/letters/the-equality-act-hurts-women?source=facebook&

The “Equality Act” Hurts Women

Numerous members of Congress have been misled by good intentions into believing that treating gender identity as identical to biological sex is an advance in civil rights. This is false.

The unintended consequences of the “Equality Act” [1] could take away women’s rights to …

  • request female staff to provide medical services or security pat downs;
  • to expect female-only staff and guests at any rape or domestic violence shelters [2];
  • or to seek legislative or judicial redress for sex discrimination.

In violation of two different United Nations human rights standards, the “Equality Act” would …

  • write sex stereotyping into law as a protected definition of legal sex;
  • and likely eliminate women’s rights to be incarcerated separately from biological males in the event of an arrest or conviction.

Further, the “Equality Act” contains no provisions that would protect against …

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Service Announcement

After the wondrous posts of our MichFest concurrent deal here, we are not getting inundated with new material, about which I am not shocked, that being quite a bit of work, what with writing an excellent essay and for no money.

Rainbow over Stanley Park

Photo credit: Ed Park

Sorry about that. You all completely rock, you women who did this for us.

I don’t want to post filler. I don’t want to post stuff a bunch of women I know have just posted. I don’t want to bring down the quality of this publication by cluttering up your feeds and inboxes thusly, dear readers.

I’ve been thinking about this a whole lot every day all week. I’m practicing. I’m finding neat stuff. I’m thinking about how to put it together in a way that is helpful and appealing.

And I could use some help.

It’s a lot of work doing a frequent news roundup. There are women who do this. I don’t want to repeat their work. I want to dig further and find yet another angle.

Stop Trans Chauvinism does excellent work reblogging other WordPress users along gender themes. Many thanks.

Cathy Brennan runs Gender Identity Watch, and GenderTrender and 4th Wave now and Autogynephilia Truth all are also working splendidly to do excellent work about gender law and exposing its failings. Much kudos, many thanks.

“What’s Current” on Feminist Current is a kind of news roundup, and I thank Susan Cox and others for these links.

But it’s a lot of work to dig for material that isn’t already all over Facebook and WordPress. Especially if you have other commitments.

So I’m up for writing submissions and also suggestions about how to make this blog original. My thoughts are currently to just dig, dig, dig, and also to not worry about linked pieces being current. There are also a lot of great forgotten feminist work out there online, and I’m looking at those too, am getting some help here!

Postscript: is there any way to search Blogger for stuff? I can tag search WordPress but I am at a loss to figure out Blogger.

Love,

Miep

On Speaking Out

By Kathy Mandigo

I have been extremely gratified by the overwhelmingly positive response I have seen to the essay I wrote, My Disservice to My Transgendered Patients, which was published on Radfem Repost.  Thank-you to all who took the time to send a comment, whether anonymously by way of a blog, or personally by other means.

A common theme that struck me was the expression of thanks for my bravery, appreciation for my courage as a health care professional to speak against the wave of transgenderism that has swept our society.

Thank You - Danke

I would say that, as I wrote and submitted the essay, I, too, thought I was taking a chance.  It took me many years to figure out my own position; when I realized that I disagreed with the prevalent medical view, it took time for me to sit with that and understand it; once I felt comfortable with what I had sorted for myself, I decided I had an obligation to make that disagreement known.  This lengthy process speaks to the pressure to conform, and to some reluctance, even fear, about going against the tide and possibly facing uncomfortable consequences.

The reality is that, to date, there have been less than a handful of negative comments, and they generally missed the points I made and were sent by anonymous people known for being professionally negative on the internet.  I have not taken such comments seriously.

That isn’t to say there isn’t cause for fear.  I know Canada is a different country than the US, that Canadians tend to yell at each other less (though we are working on reducing our civility) and we have fewer guns at large (though one of my medical school professors was murdered).

However, I believe it is important for each of us, as we can, to speak up for our beliefs, with our real names in our real lives.  If we fear losing our jobs – are those the employers we want to support with our efforts? is that an environment in which we want to spend so much of our waking hours?  If we fear losing family members – if they would leave us over this, I would venture to say they will leave us anyway, if not over this then over something else; meanwhile, we are withholding from them our true selves, our true thoughts, and our example of standing up for what we think is right.  If we fear losing our friends – are they truly friends if we can be censured for our honesty?

I suspect a big factor in people feeling afraid to speak out on transgenderism is that they see others being afraid, others using pseudonyms, and from that they assume such protection is necessary.

In my experience, to date, it is not, and, in my experience, I am standing taller and feeling more seen and validated than I ever have in my professional career.

That being said, I have not had any comments from my personal colleagues, I assume most likely because most of them haven’t seen the essay, and others already knew my thoughts.  I look forward to my colleagues whom I know to feel as I do to speak out, to increase our numbers and make our voice stronger.  I look forward to my colleagues having an honest public discussion as health care professionals about what, exactly, we are doing, and whether any of us want to continue down this path.

When we stay hidden, we give our power away.  Having seen the truth, living a lie diminishes us. Don’t all of us, when hearing of atrocities far from us in time or place, want to believe that, had we been there, we would have met the challenge and stood up for what we believed was right? Those of us who are early to see the lie have the responsibility, and honour, to light a different course and provide guidance, and perhaps, by our actions, we will bring relief to some who otherwise would have continued to suffer.

When we speak our truth, we feel our integrity expand and solidify.  We find new friends, with whom we can breath deeply.  We discover how very proud we have made some of those who love us. And then it gets easier to be a bit more courageous the next time, and the next, to the point where it no longer feels like courage, but simply doing the necessary thing, and we wonder what ever held us back in the first place.

The more of us who speak out against transgenderism, as real people with real jobs and real families and real friends, the sooner we can halt at least this faction of the gender industry and the atrocities being rendered in the name of gender dysphoria. Then we will have more energy and attention to turn to other, vital issues.

Exiles in their own flesh: A psychotherapist speaks

4thWaveNow

This is a guest post submitted by Lane Anderson (a pseudonym), a practicing psychotherapist who has worked extensively with “trans kids” and their families. She shares with us her clinical insights into her clients, child psychology, and the impact of the transgender phenomenon on our society as a whole.

If there are other mental health providers reading this post, please consider guest posting or responding in the comments section below the article.


I am a licensed psychotherapist. I’m writing this post on my last day at a teen health clinic, where I’ve seen patients and their families for nearly a decade.

In the past year especially, it’s become increasingly clear to me that I cannot uphold the primary value of my profession, to do no harm, without also seriously jeopardizing my standing in the professional community.  It’s a terrible and unfortunate conflict of interest. I’ve lost much sleep over the fact that, for a significant portion of my clients and their parents, I am unable to provide what they profess…

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