Becoming a lesbian, part one

Video: Eleven gender non-conforming women

Project: The effect of watching porn on women

Pornography celebrates pedophilia

Purple Sage

Warning: this post contains upsetting content regarding the porn industry.

The most popular theme in pornography is “teen.” The teen genre features 18 year old girls who are supposedly virgins and being deflowered by older, more experienced men, and pseudo-child pornography where the 18 year old is made to appear younger and has to act out an incest or molestation theme.

In Gail Dines’ book Pornland, she has a chapter called Children–the Final Taboo where she describes the connection between the sexualization of underage girls in popular culture, the pseudo-child porn genre and actual child porn. Dines begins by describing several fashion and magazine images that appeared in the last few decades that sexualize teenage girls and pose them as if for a porn shoot.

Miley Cyrus Miley Cyrus, age 16, Elle magazine

French Vogue French Vogue magazine 2011

French Vogue Magazine

“As pop culture begins to look more and more pornographic, the…

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Top pediatricians REJECT puberty-blockers, “ideology-driven social experiment on vulnerable children and their families”

The truth about AUTOGYNEPHILIA

Some leading pediatricians have recently written a great letter to the important medical journal Pediatrics. They objected to a recent article in that journal recommending incredibly toxic and dangerous “care” for children who don’t follow “gender” stereotypes. The article was pushing the usual trans-medical industry line that these children should be put on puberty blockers and fast-tracked for transsexualism and a lifetime under clinical surveillance. It is encouraging that there is some serious scientific resistance to the horrible things being done to children. There is no such thing as a “transgender child.“Innate gender identity” is a lie.

Here is the full text of the letter in response to that insane article.

Puberty is not a disorder

We vigorously object to the normalization of childhood gender identity disorder (GID) promoted by the American…

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The Way Trans Activists “Argue” with “TERFS” *Trigger Warning*

Your (Personal) Therapy Is Political: Thoughts on “Against Therapy”

On Speaking Out

By Kathy Mandigo

I have been extremely gratified by the overwhelmingly positive response I have seen to the essay I wrote, My Disservice to My Transgendered Patients, which was published on Radfem Repost.  Thank-you to all who took the time to send a comment, whether anonymously by way of a blog, or personally by other means.

A common theme that struck me was the expression of thanks for my bravery, appreciation for my courage as a health care professional to speak against the wave of transgenderism that has swept our society.

Thank You - Danke

I would say that, as I wrote and submitted the essay, I, too, thought I was taking a chance.  It took me many years to figure out my own position; when I realized that I disagreed with the prevalent medical view, it took time for me to sit with that and understand it; once I felt comfortable with what I had sorted for myself, I decided I had an obligation to make that disagreement known.  This lengthy process speaks to the pressure to conform, and to some reluctance, even fear, about going against the tide and possibly facing uncomfortable consequences.

The reality is that, to date, there have been less than a handful of negative comments, and they generally missed the points I made and were sent by anonymous people known for being professionally negative on the internet.  I have not taken such comments seriously.

That isn’t to say there isn’t cause for fear.  I know Canada is a different country than the US, that Canadians tend to yell at each other less (though we are working on reducing our civility) and we have fewer guns at large (though one of my medical school professors was murdered).

However, I believe it is important for each of us, as we can, to speak up for our beliefs, with our real names in our real lives.  If we fear losing our jobs – are those the employers we want to support with our efforts? is that an environment in which we want to spend so much of our waking hours?  If we fear losing family members – if they would leave us over this, I would venture to say they will leave us anyway, if not over this then over something else; meanwhile, we are withholding from them our true selves, our true thoughts, and our example of standing up for what we think is right.  If we fear losing our friends – are they truly friends if we can be censured for our honesty?

I suspect a big factor in people feeling afraid to speak out on transgenderism is that they see others being afraid, others using pseudonyms, and from that they assume such protection is necessary.

In my experience, to date, it is not, and, in my experience, I am standing taller and feeling more seen and validated than I ever have in my professional career.

That being said, I have not had any comments from my personal colleagues, I assume most likely because most of them haven’t seen the essay, and others already knew my thoughts.  I look forward to my colleagues whom I know to feel as I do to speak out, to increase our numbers and make our voice stronger.  I look forward to my colleagues having an honest public discussion as health care professionals about what, exactly, we are doing, and whether any of us want to continue down this path.

When we stay hidden, we give our power away.  Having seen the truth, living a lie diminishes us. Don’t all of us, when hearing of atrocities far from us in time or place, want to believe that, had we been there, we would have met the challenge and stood up for what we believed was right? Those of us who are early to see the lie have the responsibility, and honour, to light a different course and provide guidance, and perhaps, by our actions, we will bring relief to some who otherwise would have continued to suffer.

When we speak our truth, we feel our integrity expand and solidify.  We find new friends, with whom we can breath deeply.  We discover how very proud we have made some of those who love us. And then it gets easier to be a bit more courageous the next time, and the next, to the point where it no longer feels like courage, but simply doing the necessary thing, and we wonder what ever held us back in the first place.

The more of us who speak out against transgenderism, as real people with real jobs and real families and real friends, the sooner we can halt at least this faction of the gender industry and the atrocities being rendered in the name of gender dysphoria. Then we will have more energy and attention to turn to other, vital issues.

Exiles in their own flesh: A psychotherapist speaks

4thWaveNow

This is a guest post submitted by Lane Anderson (a pseudonym), a practicing psychotherapist who has worked extensively with “trans kids” and their families. She shares with us her clinical insights into her clients, child psychology, and the impact of the transgender phenomenon on our society as a whole.

If there are other mental health providers reading this post, please consider guest posting or responding in the comments section below the article.


I am a licensed psychotherapist. I’m writing this post on my last day at a teen health clinic, where I’ve seen patients and their families for nearly a decade.

In the past year especially, it’s become increasingly clear to me that I cannot uphold the primary value of my profession, to do no harm, without also seriously jeopardizing my standing in the professional community.  It’s a terrible and unfortunate conflict of interest. I’ve lost much sleep over the fact that, for a significant portion of my clients and their parents, I am unable to provide what they profess…

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The Walled-In Women

By Selma Nieuwoudt (aka Selma Newforest)

“….and she scores!” For 90 minutes the screen of her mobile made her small enough to squeeze through the bars of her holding cell. As the joy of watching agile feet fades, she gathers courage to climb her mountains for the day: laundry, floors, a bath if there is energy to spare. On good days, she chops wood and gathers pine cones for the winter hearth.

She makes art during the always-too-short times when her medication kicks in. Some days she has to scuffle alongside the walls when the pain pulls her inside herself. Visitors are a fantasy, and phone calls dried up when her tongue and throat turned to stone.

She is a walled-in woman. Isolated, fatigued, pain-gnawed. The internet is the window in her cell and she does more than look at the view. She is a feminist. She fights for women. She fights for lesbians, knowing she’ll most likely never feel the soft womanwarmth of a beloved in her embrace again.

She is strong. A shieldmaiden. On her sword is engraved courage. Her shield is painted with compassion. Sometimes her armour gets too heavy and she stumbles under the burden, but she’ll get up. She always does.

image

Her needs are simple and her plans are big. She has a vision of women’s communes. She wants to build bridges to connect women in a world where men made borders. She wants togetherness with women. She wants to transform bomb craters into pools where women can soak their feet and laugh in the sunshine.

She dances in her heart. For you. Her feet kick up dust to make you laugh. Her heart-voice sings you healing. Heart-eyes see your pain and you are never less-than to her.

I am a walled-in woman. There are many like me. Speak to us, we listen. Show your wounds, we will bandage them. Call us to battle, we will fight. We can be a community. We are your sisters. We love you.

Heart, Under The Sky